We All Live in the Forbidden City Image

Please check back for information on upcoming exhibition related programs.


For more information on exhibition related programs at China Institute, please call (212) 744-8181.

Performance

A Lecture and Performance of Peking Opera

Peking Opera, arguably the most popular form of theater in modern China, embodies all major vernacular performance arts—music, dance, mime, and acrobatics. Audience will enjoy an explanatory lecture by China Institute’s Senior Lecturer Ben Wang and a performance of vignettes from the classical repertoire by New York City’s very own “Singing Delivery Man,” Yang Yu Bao, who was recently featured in the New York Daily News.

Tuesday, November 16 ~ 6:30 – 8:30 PM
$20 member / $25 non-member


Short Course

Windows to a Culture—The Fascinating Chinese Proverbs

Rich and colorful, the Chinese language blends music and painting: a language nonpareil in its unique visceral quality. The Chinese proverbs, mostly four-character phrases, concise but deep in their meanings, take a special place in Chinese culture, illustrating moral and emotional expressions. The philosophical and often incisive messages the proverbs carry are alternately somber, didactic, amusing, hilarious or ironic. Used properly in writings or speeches, they can achieve what cannot be achieved by other ways of articulating the same thoughts. This three-session course in English will cover some of the most poignant and evocative among the thousands of Chinese proverbs. Previous knowledge of Chinese is not required.

Ben Wang is Senior Lecturer in Humanities and Chinese Language at China Institute and an award-winning translator.

Tuesdays, October 26, November 2 and 9 ~ 6:30 – 8:30 PM
$85 member / $95 non-member (3 sessions)
$30 member / $35 non-member (per session)

Short Course

Windows to a Culture —The Fascinating Chinese Proverbs II

By popular demand, join us for another session of fascinating lectures by Ben Wang on a specially selected collection of Chinese proverbs.

Rich and colorful, the Chinese language blends music and painting — a language nonpareil in its unique visceral quality. The Chinese proverbs, mostly four-character phrases, concise but deep in their meanings, take a special place in Chinese culture, illustrating moral and emotional expressions. The philosophical and often incisive messages the proverbs carry are alternately somber, didactic, amusing, hilarious, or ironic. Used properly in writings or speeches, they can achieve what cannot be achieved by other ways of articulating the same thoughts. This five- session course, held in English, will cover some of the most poignant and evocative among the thousands of Chinese proverbs. Previous knowledge of Chinese is not required.

Ben Wang is Senior Lecturer in Humanities and Chinese Language at China Institute and an award-winning translator.

Tuesdays, November 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 ~ 6:30 – 8:30 PM
$135 member / $158 non-member (full course)
$30 member / $35 non-member (per session)


Curator’s Lecture

Kuiyi Shen and Julia Andrews, guest co-curators of the exhibition, will speak about their work on Blooming in the Shadows: Unofficial Chinese Art, 1974–1985. Kuiyi Shen is Director of Chinese Studies Program and Professor of Asian Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the University of California, San Diego. His teaching and writings have focused on Chinese and Japanese art with an emphasis on modern and contemporary Chinese art and Sino-Japanese art exchanges in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Julia Andrews is Professor of Art History at the Ohio State University and a specialist in Chinese painting and modern Chinese art. Her first book, Painters and Politics in the People’s Republic of China (1994), won the Joseph Levenson Prize of the Association for Asian Studies for the best book of the year on modern China.

Thursday, September 15 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Symposium

Blooming in the Shadows: Art and Culture at the Dawn of the Post-Mao Era

Renowned scholars and artists will speak on history and law, art history, literature, and performance to contextualize this ground-breaking exhibition. Distinguished senior expert on East Asian law, Professor Jerome A. Cohen, who helped pioneer the introduction of East Asian legal systems and perspectives into American legal curricula, will give the opening remarks. Dr. Jane DeBevoise of Asia Art Archive, former Deputy Director of the Guggenheim Museum, will moderate.

Saturday, September 17 ~ 9 AM – 4:30 PM
$30 member / $35 non-member


Art Salon

The No Names Group

Please join us for a rare opportunity to meet three of the artists of the No Names Group to discuss their works in the exhibition. Presentation and discussion will be conducted in Mandarin and translated into English.

Tuesday, September 20 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Sinomathèque Film Screening

Sunflower, directed by ZHANG Yang, 2005

In conjunction with China Institute’s exhibition, Blooming in the Shadows: Unofficial Chinese Art, 1974–1985, Sinomathèque is proud to present Sunflower, the moving tale of a family after the father’s return from a re-education camp during the Cultural Revolution. The father, an artist, is no longer able to work in his previous profession due to his injured hands and instead he places all of his hopes on cultivating the artistic talents of his son. While the son eventually follows in his father’s footsteps becoming an artist himself, he carries a great deal of resentment towards him, creating a tense relationship between the two. The film broken into three parts, depicts the interaction between the family members, as the son transitions into adulthood.

Seating is limited, pre-registration required.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011 ~ 6:30 – 8:45PM
FREE

Reservations are on a first-come, first-served basis.


Lecture

Chinese Archaeology & World Cultural Heritage

Dr. Magnus Fiskesjö, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Cornell University, will speak about Chinese archaeology in the context of global heritage issues, including the tensions between the values of national history and global perspectives on heritage and preservation. He will also address the threats to archaeological heritage sites in China, including from looting driven by both international and growing domestic markets for collectibles, and the progress of cultural heritage work under way in China.

Thursday, May 19 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Lecture

Music of a Disordered Age:
Chuci in the Music of the Ancient Chinese Qin Zither

Dr. Mingmei Yip, Ph.D., is a noted qin musician, author, and artist. During this special program, Dr. Yip will first discuss Songs of the South (Chuci) as reflected in the qin repertoire and follow with a performance of compositions inspired by this poetic canon on the qin, accompanied with singing.

Tuesday, May 3 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Lecture

Bronze Age Cultures in the North

Dr. Li Feng, Associate Director of Center for Archaeology and Assistant Professor of Early Chinese Cultural History, Columbia University, is a leading specialist of China’s Bronze Age. Dr. Li will discuss the traditional bronze cultures in the Central Plain region and cross-regional communications.

Tuesday, March 15 ~ 6:30-8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Short Course

Paul Chih Meng Memorial Short Course:
Timeless Poetry of the South

This unique course will be taught by the Institute’s own Senior Lecturer in Chinese Language and Humanities, Ben Wang, a distinguished scholar and award-winning translator of Chinese drama and poetry. This course will begin with Songs of the South (Chuci) and cover a pair of examples of Song-dynasty poetry (Songci) in the style of Songs of the South. No previous knowledge of Chinese is required.

Tuesdays, April 5, 12, and 26 ~ 6:30 – 8:30 PM
$85 member / $95 non-member (3 sessions)
$30 member / $35 non-member (per session)


Lecture

The Axial Age — How Philosophy and Medicine Began

Dr. Geoffrey Redmond, M.D., Center for Health Research, will introduce the ancient text Yijing (Book of Changes) and manuscripts from the Yangzi River region that formed the basis of Chiense thought and medicine. The audience is invited to participate in an educational demo of the Yijing.

Tuesday, March 8 ~ 6:30-8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Curator’s Lecture

Ancient Bronzes in Hunan: A Survey

The middle bank of the Yangzi River is one of the most significant cradles of Chinese civilization and a historical area for the study of China’s Bronze Age. Several important excavations in the past few decades have enabled us to examine the little known aspects of this culture through exquisite bronze vessels. Guest co-curator, Dr. Jay Xu, will speak about the fascinating story of this regional culture in three ways: the development and characteristics of Hunan bronzes, their function and patronage, and their cultural connection to central China.

Along the Yangzi River: Regional Culture of the Bronze Age from Hunan is an original exhibition organized by China Institute Gallery in collaboration with the Hunan Provincial Museum.

Dr. Jay Xu is a widely published scholar, particularly on ancient Chinese bronzes and archaeology—his area of expertise. His prolific writings or translations cover diverse areas, including ancient Chinese jades, Chinese ceramics, Chinese calligraphy, and museum practice. The book Art of the Houma Foundry (Princeton University Press, 1996), to which he contributed, was awarded the prestigious Shimada Prize of 1997 for the Outstanding Publication on the History of Eastern Asian art. His publications have appeared in books and in such journals as Orientations, Natural History, Artibus Asiae, and Journal of East Asian Archaeology. He is much in demand as a speaker on topics related to Chinese art or museum practice, circumnavigating the globe from numerous cities across the United States to mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Korea.

Monday, February 28 ~ 6:30–8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Lecture

Bronze Age Cultures in the South

Dr. John Major, Senior Lectuer at China Institute and a former professor, at Dartmouth College, will speak about thte cultures that flourished along the Yangzi River during the Bronze Age and his recent publication The Huainanzi: A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Government in Early Han China

Tuesday, March 1 ~ 6:30-8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member

CURATOR’S LECTURE

New “China”: Porcelain Art from Jingdezhen, 1910–2012

Guest co-curators, Lili Fang, Director of the Art Anthropology Research Center of the Chinese National Academy of Arts in Beijing and a leading author on Jingdezhen studies, and Nancy Selvage, former Director of the Ceramics Program at Harvard University, will discuss the history of Jingdezhen and the work of artists inspired by this famous city.

Friday, September 21 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member

For more information please call Eva Wen at 212-744-8181 x121 or ewen@chinainstitute.org


SYMPOSIUM

New “China”: Porcelain Art from Jingdezhen, 1910–2012

Renowned artists and curators will present on:

  • Jingdezhen: History and Development of Contemporary Chinese Porcelain
  • Chinese Porcelain: Contemporary Global Impact on Artists and Education
  • Contemporary Chinese Porcelain: Curatorial Perspectives

Confirmed Speakers

Beatrice L. Chang, Director, Dai Ichi Arts

Chen Haibo, Head of Shanghai Station, Art Appraisal Committee of the Cultural Market Department Center of the Ministry of Culture

Caroline Cheng, Artist, Educator, Curator, Lecturer, and Director, The Pottery Workshop (Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jingdezhen, Beijing)

Carla Coch, Associate Director, Confucius Institute at Alfred University

Lili Fang, Director of the Art Anthropology Research Center of the Chinese National Academy of Arts (Beijing)

Sin-ying Ho, Associate Professor, Art Department – Deputy Chair of Studio Art, Queens College (City University of New York)

Zhu Legeng, Artist

Andrew Maske, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Kentucky

Nancy Selvage, Former Director of the Ceramics Program at Harvard University

*Please check back for more updates and schedule.

Saturday, September 22 ~ 1 – 5 PM
$30 member / $35 non-member

SOLD OUT


Annual Lecture on World Cultural Heritage

Arts & Culture is pleased to announce its second annual lecture on world cultural heritage with the Global Heritage Fund. Since its founding, GHF has focused its efforts in developing countries and regions on preservation and responsible development of the most important and endangered global heritage sites. GHF projects are selected using strict criteria developed by its Board of Trustees and Senior Advisory Board, and work on each project follows a methodology termed Preservation by Design®. Jeff Morgan, Executive Director of GHF, and Kuang-Han Li, GHF’s China Project Manager, will speak about GHF’s projects in China, including the Foguang Temple, Lijiang ancient town, the tulous in Fujian province, and the city of Pingyao in Shanxi.

Jeff Morgan is a trained urban and regional planner; at GHF, he is responsible for global conservation excellence, building a leading international conservancy, and improving the lives in communities where GHF sites are located. He is a co-author of Cracking the Japanese Market: Keys to Success in the New Global Economy (Free Press, 1991) and Saving Our Global Heritage (GHF Press, 2004). He serves on the Advisory Board of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and GHF’s Board of Trustees and Senior Advisory Board.

Tuesday, May 1 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Short Course

Classical Musical Drama of China: Laughter and Tears of a People

Blending poetry with singing, dancing, and acting, the classical Chinese musical drama fully reflects the rich emotions, laughter, and tears of the Chinese people. Although conceived during the ancient Zhou Period (1100–500 BCE) with its early and inchoate music and dance separately performed, it was not born until the Yuan dynasty in the 13th century. The following Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties saw the ripening of the classical musical drama, as how it was represented by Kunqu, the towering musical drama, which in turn gave birth to hundreds of local dramas in China, among which Beijing Opera shines as Kunqu’s most prominent descendant.

In this 3-session course, Ben Wang, an authority on Kunqu, will introduce the history of the classical Chinese drama, the unique poetic and visceral qualities of Kunqu and Beijing Opera. As the finale of the course, the life and art of Mei Lanfang (1894–1961), the greatest performer of the two genres, will be discussed. No previous knowledge of the Chinese language is required.

Ben Wang is China Institute’s Senior Lecturer in Language and Humanities, and an award-winning translator. He is author and translator of Laughter and Tears, a selection of Kunqu dramas, published in June 2009.

Tuesdays, April 10, 17, and 24 ~ 6:30 – 8:30 PM
$85 member / $95 non-member (three sessions)
$30 member / $35 non-member (per session)


Lecture
Precursors of Chinese Theater and Early Performances during the Song

This talk introduces some early developments in Chinese music, performing forms, and literature which later became important components of Chinese theater. It will also lead us to the Song Dynasty during which China’s economic system, social structure, and cultural environment directly nurtured the flourishing of early theater performances.

Xing Fan is an Assistant Professor of Chinese in the Asian Studies Program at Bates College. She holds a Ph.D. in Asian Theater from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and an M.A. in Chinese Theater Studies from the Academy of Chinese Traditional Theater in Beijing. At Bates College, Dr. Fan teaches “Drama and Theater of China,” “Art and Politics in China,” “Chinese Traditions, Great and Small” and Chinese language.

Tuesday, April 3 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member


Short Course on the Arts and History of China, Part I

Join Dr. Hsin-Mei Agnes Hsu, Resident Scholar and Consulting Archaeologist to UNESCO World Heritage Centre and Discovery Channel’s Ancient Manmade Marvels series, for an introductory virtual tour of China’s great museums. This multimedia course to the arts and history of China from the earliest cultures to the Song dynasties will help students better understand China Institute’s new exhibition, Theater, Life, and the Afterlife: Tomb Décor of the Jin Dynasty from Shanxi (February 9 – June 17, 2012). No prior coursework on Chinese culture is required.

Prior to joining China Institute in 2008, Dr. Hsu served on the faculty of Brown University (2004–2007) and was a Mellon research scholar in Classics at Stanford University (2007–2008). First trained in Classical Archaeology, Dr. Hsu’s research and publications have focused on cross-cultural studies of early empires, and include “The Exceptional Universal Value of the Road Systems in Ancient Empires: A Comparative Study of the Chinese Oasis Route of the Early Silk Road and the Qhapag Ñan,” a chapter in Geography, Ethnography, and Perceptions of the World from Antiquity to the Renaissance, and “An Emic Perspective of the Ancient Mapmaker’s Art,” which was published by Cambridge University Press and considered for the Barwis-Holliday Award for Far Eastern Studies by the Royal Asiatic Society. Dr. Hsu was the Special Assistant to a former U.S. Ambassador to China and Korea and has served on two UNESCO international committees. She will lead her second UNESCO-American Museum of Natural History study expedition to Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan in April 2012.

Tuesdays, January 24, 31, February 14, and 28 ~ 6:30 – 8:30 PM
$200 member / $250 non-member (4 sessions)
$55 member / $70 non-member (per session)


Lecture

The Afterlife, Architecture, and Drama: Jin-Yuan Tombs in Southern Shanxi

Renowned scholar and leading architectural historian, Dr. Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt is Professor of East Asian Art in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania and Curator of Chinese Art at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She is author of Chinese Traditional Architecture (1984), Chinese Imperial City Planning (1990), and Liao Architecture (1997), editor and adaptor of A History of Chinese Architecture (2002), co-editor of Hawaii Reader in Traditional Chinese Culture (2005), and has written more than 60 scholarly articles and more than 30 book reviews. She has given more than 120 public lectures and conference talks. Dr. Steinhardt has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, American Philosophical Society, Graham Foundation for Advanced Study in the Fine Arts, Social Science Research Foundation, and Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation.

Thursday, February 9 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member

SOLD OUT


For information please call 212-744-8181 x111 or email lchrysostome@chinainstitute.org.

SYMPOSIUM: INSPIRED BY DUNHUANG

Renowned scholars will present on art, history, literature and religious studies to contextualize this year’s Dunhuang exhibitions. The symposium will also give voice to several artists in the exhibition Inspired by Dunhuang: Re-creation in Contemporary Chinese Art, on view at China Institute Gallery (December 14, 2013 – June 8, 2014).

SCHEDULE

9:30am
Registration, coffee and light breakfast
10:00am Welcome by Thomas Moore, Acting President, China Institute
10:05am Willow Weilan Hai, Director of China Institute Gallery introduces Mimi Gardner Gates
10:15am Keynote Address: Mimi Gardner Gates, Director Emerita of the Seattle Art Museum
“What is Dunhuang?”
10:45am
PANELDunhuang in its Own Time

Susan Whitfield, Director of the International Dunhuang Project, The British Library
“The Buddhist Cave Temple: Its Journey from India to Dunhuang”

Karen Hwang, Assistant Professor, Department of Art, Vassar College
“This Image Came Flying: The Geopolitics of Miraculous Images”

Mary Anne Cartelli, Assistant Professor, Department of Classical and Oriental Studies, Hunter College
“The Buddhist Poetics of Dunhuang”

Moderator: Annette L. Juliano, Professor of Asian Art History, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
12:30pm
Lunch
2:00pm Talk: Alfreda Murck, Independent Scholar
“Using the Past to Serve the Present: Inspiration from Dunhuang for Ceramic Design”
2:30pm ARTIST PANELDunhuang Reborn for Our Time

Liu Dan, Wang Mansheng, Zhang Hongtu, and other artists

Moderator: Jerome Silbergeld, the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History, Chair of the Department of Art & Archaeology at Princeton University and Director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art

4:15pm Closing Remarks: Willow Weilan Hai
4:30pm
Reception and Gallery Viewing

Saturday, December 14
$30 member / $35 non-member


CURATOR’S LECTURE

Willow Weilan Hai, Director of China Institute Gallery, and Jerome Silbergeld, the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University and Director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art, will offer insights into the role of Dunhuang as a source of inspiration for contemporary Chinese artists. Dr. Silbergeld will also give a talk entitled, Inspiration, Influence, Imagination: The Role of the Past in Chinese Art.

Friday, December 13 ~ 6:30 – 8PM
$10 member / $15 non-member

For more information, please call Eva Wen at 212-744-8181 x 121 or email ewen@chinainstitute.org.


ART SALON

Orchid Pavilion Salon

China Institute Gallery welcomes the Chinese community of art and history lovers to appreciate the exhibition and to resume the traditional literati gathering.

Friday, June 28 ~ 6 – 8 PM

For more information, please call Eva Wen at 212-744-8181 x121 or ewen@chinainstitute.org


CURATOR’S LECTURE

Dunhuang: Buddhist Art at the Gateway of the Silk Road

Annette L. Juliano, Exhibition Guest Scholar, is Professor of Asian Art History at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and an expert on Buddhist and non-Buddhist art along the Silk Road. Professor Juliano’s scholarly focus is on China during the Six Dynasties period from the third through the seventh centuries.

Friday, April 19 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member

SOLD OUT

For more information, please call Eva Wen at 212-744-8181 x121 or ewen@chinainstitute.org.

SHORT COURSE – FILM SERIES

The Cultural Revolution on Film

CR on Film

One of the most dramatic periods in Chinese history, still reverberating today, the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) is also one of the least understood. In this short course of six films, made during and after the Cultural Revolution by both Chinese and Western filmmakers, experts in the Chinese and cinema studies fields examine the period and discuss its relevance for China today. This series is organized in conjunction with China Institute’s exhibition, Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution.

Series Schedule

Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Two Stage Sisters (1964) One of China’s most beloved modern feature films, depicts the exploitation of two female opera stars and the different paths their lives take. Directed by Xie Jin and introduced by Richard Peña, Director Emeritus of the New York Film Festival and Professor of Film Studies at Columbia University.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Morning Sun (2003) Documentary based on rare archival footage and interviews with participants, both famous and ordinary, seen through the lens of propaganda cinema. Directed by Geremie Barmé, Richard Gordon, and Carma Hinton. Introduced by Carma Hinton, who was raised in China, and is both a filmmaker and the Robinson Professor of Visual Culture and Chinese Studies at George Mason University.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
The Drugstore and The Football Incident (1975) A famous leftist documentarian’s take on the Cultural Revolution, in two films from the only cinema verite series ever made on the Cultural Revolution. Directed by Joris Ivens and Marceline Loridan, introduced by Nancy Jervis, China specialist who worked with the filmmakers on the English versions of the films.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
An Evening of Cultural Revolution Cinema. Immerse yourself in the Cultural Revolution in this illustrated lecture by Richard Peña, with excerpts from the eight model operas and the feature film Breaking with Old Ideas (1975).

Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Though I am Gone (2006) A gripping documentary about the Cultural Revolution’s first violent event, which took place at a prestigious girls’ high school in Beijing. Directed by Hu Jie and introduced by Weili Ye, a former student at the girls’ school and Professor of Chinese History at UMass/Boston.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Sacrificed Youth (1985) An elegiac and rarely screened feature film about the “sent-down youth,” set among the Dai minority in Southwestern China. Directed by Zhang Nuanxin with post-film discussion by Renqiu Yu, Professor of Chinese History at SUNY/Purchase.

Wednesdays, October 15 – November 19 ~ 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Members: $12 single ticket
Non-Members: $15 single ticket


CURATOR’S LECTURE

Mao’s Golden Mangoes: The Intersection of Fruit, Art, Passion, and Propaganda

In 1968 during China’s “Cultural Revolution,” the cult of Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong was at a high. A Pakistani foreign minister presented Mao with a crate of mangoes that he distributed to the Mao Zedong Thought Propaganda Teams who were occupying the Tsinghua University campus. The gift of mangoes happened to coincide with a shift in the leadership of the Cultural Revolution from students to the military under the guise of the working class. Alfreda Murck, an independent scholar and a curator of Chinese art, will tell the story of the improbable transformation of the mango from then unfamiliar fruit to a symbol of Mao’s love for his people and the workers.

Thursday, September 18 ~ 6:30 – 8 PM
$10 member / $15 non-member

For more information, please call Eva Wen at 212-744-8181 x121 or ewen@chinainstitute.org.


ART SALON

2nd Annual Orchid Pavilion Salon

China Institute Gallery welcomes the New York community of Chinese art and history lovers to appreciate our current exhibition, Inspired by Dunhuang: Re-creation in Contemporary Chinese Art, and to resume the traditional literati gathering.

6:15pm
Gallery Tour of Inspired by Dunhuang: Re-creation in Contemporary Chinese Art
with Willow Weilan Hai, Director of China Institute Gallery
6:30 – 8:00pm
Reception with wine and other refreshments
6:30 – 7:00pm
Artwork Show and Tell with the New York China Association of Collectors
7:00 – 7:45pm
Screening of the film, Guarding Dunhuang

 

Friday, May 9 ~ 6 – 8 PM
This event is sponsored by the New York China Association of Collectors and is free of charge but pre-registration is required.